Introit

Introit
Traditional Mass

Saturday, March 01, 2014

MARCH 1 FERIAL DAY; OUR LADY'S SATURDAY MASS; ST. DAVID OF WALES (601 A.D.); ST. ALBINUS (549 A.D.)





March 1

FERIAL DAY


Mass of preceding Sunday
is celebrated 
or

Our Lady's Saturday
Mass
Salve Sancta Parens


SAINT DAVID OF WALES
(601 A.D.)
[Historical]


Born to the Welsh royalty, the son of King Sandde, Prince of Powys, and of Saint Non, the daughter of a chieftain of Menevia (western Wales). Grandson of Ceredig, Prince of Cardigan. Uncle of King ArthurPriestStudied under Saint Paul Aurelian. Worked with Saint ColumbanusSaint Gildas the Wise, and Saint Finnigan. Missionary and founder of monasteries.
Following his contribution to the synod of Brevi in Cardiganshire, he was chosen primate of the Cambrian Church. Archbishopof Caerleon on Usk, he moved the see to Menevia. Presided at the Synod of Brefi which condemned the Pelagian heresy. Encouraged and founded monasteries. First to build a chancel to Saint Joseph of Arimathea‘s wattle church at Glastonbury.
After a vision in his monastery in the Rhos Valley, he set out next day with two monks to Jerusalem to aid the Patriarch. While there his preaching converted anti-Christians. Legend says that once while he was preaching, a dove descended to his shoulder to show he had the blessings of the Spirit, and that the earth rose to lift him high above the people so that he could be heard by them all. Another time when was preaching to a crowd at Llandewi Brefi, people on the outer edges could not hear, so he spread a handkerchief on the ground, stood on it, and the ground beneath rose up in a pillar so all could hear.
SAINT ALBINUS OF ANGERS
Bishop (549 A.D.)
[Historical]


Born to a noble family of Brittany. Pious childMonk from his mid-20′s into his 60′s at Timcillac, which later renamed itself Saint Aubin‘s in his honour. Abbot for 25 years, beginning in 504Bishop of the diocese of AngersFrance from c.529. His episcopacy was known for his charity to the poorwidows and orphans, for his ransoming of slaves from their owners, his personal holiness, and the miracles he worked.
Custom of the day permitted consanguinary marriage. Albinus decried this as incest, and fought against it, making enemies in many powerful families who practiced it. He called councils at Orleans in 538 and 541, both of which condemned this and other morals offenses.
Legend says that when he visited Etheria, a woman imprisoned by King Childebert for bad debts, the woman threw herself at Albinus’ feet, and pled for help. A guard made a move to strike her, but Albinus breathed in the man’s face, and he fell dead. Etheria was soon released.
Another time Augin passed a prison tower in Angers, and heard the cries and moans of badly treated prisoners. He pled with the local magistrate for their release, but was refused. He returned to the tower and prayed in front of it; after several hours, a landslide brought down part of the tower, the prisoners escaped, followed Albinus to the church of Saint Maurichies, reformed their ways, and became model citizens and Christians.
The abbey of Saint Aubin in Angers was erected in his memory.